Universalis
Tuesday 19 June 2018    (other days)
Saint Romuald, Abbot 
 or Tuesday of week 11 in Ordinary Time 

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.


INTRODUCTION
O God, come to our aid.
  O Lord, make haste to help us.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.

Hymn
Worship, glory, praise and honour
To our God, high-throned above:
We, with many generations
Join to praise thy name of love.
In the scriptures, by the Spirit,
May we see the Saviour’s face,
Hear his word and heed his calling,
Know his will and grow in grace.

Psalm 67 (68)
The Lord's triumphal journey
Let God arise, let those who hate him flee before him.
God arises and his enemies are scattered:
  those who hate him flee from his sight.
You blow them away like wisps of smoke;
  as wax melts in front of a fire,
  so the wicked melt away before God.
The righteous are glad and exult in God’s sight;
  they rejoice in their gladness.
Sing to the Lord and celebrate his name!
Make a road for him who rides upon the clouds –
  “The Lord” is his name.
Rejoice in his sight,
  the father of orphans, defender of widows,
  God in his holy dwelling-place,
God, who gives the lonely a house to dwell in,
  God, who leads captives out into prosperity;
  but the rebellious shall live in a desert land.
God, when you set out in the sight of your people,
  when you crossed the wilderness – the earth shook.
The heavens sent down dew at your coming –
  the God of Sinai, the God of Israel.
At your bidding the rains came, O God,
  your inheritance was worn out but you refreshed it.
All your creatures took up residence there,
  in your goodness you made a place for the needy.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Let God arise, let those who hate him flee before him.

Psalm 67 (68)
This God of ours is a God who saves. The Lord holds the keys of death.
The Lord gives out the word,
  and a great army of maidens brings the news:
“The kings of the armies are fleeing, they are fleeing,
  and the fair one at home is dividing the spoils.
While you sleep among the sheepfolds,
  the wings of the dove shine with silver,
  her feathers glow with green gold.
Through her the Almighty scatters the kings,
  and the mountain of Zalmon is white with snow.”
The mountain of Bashan is God’s mountain;
  the mountain of God is a high-peaked mountain.
Why do you envy it, you high-peaked mountains,
  envy the mountain that God has chosen?
  The Lord will dwell there for ever.
The chariots of God are ten thousand thousand:
  the Lord has come from Sinai to his holy sanctuary.
You have scaled the heights, you have taken captives,
  you have received men as gifts
  so that even the rebels live with the Lord God.
Blessings on the Lord, day after day!
  God will carry us, God our saviour.
Our God is a God of salvation,
  our Lord is a Lord who rescues from death.
Truly God will break the heads of his enemies,
  take the scalps of those who tread the path of crime.
The Lord has spoken:
  “I shall bring them back from Bashan,
  I shall bring them back from the depths of the sea,
so that your feet may be dipped in blood
  and the tongues of your dogs receive food from your enemies.”
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
This God of ours is a God who saves. The Lord holds the keys of death.

Psalm 67 (68)
Kingdoms of the earth, sing to God, praise the Lord.
They have seen your processions, O God,
  the processions of God, my king, to his sanctuary.
First came the singers, last the musicians,
  between them the maidens playing their drums.
“Bless God in the assemblies:
  bless the Lord, you who spring from Israel!”
There was young Benjamin, leading them,
  the princes of Judah in their rich robes,
  the princes of Zebulun, the princes of Naphtali.
O God, command in your strength;
  make firm what you have achieved in us.
From your temple in Jerusalem,
  kings shall bring you tribute.
Rebuke the wild beast of the reeds,
  the herd of bulls, the lords of peoples.
  Let them lie prostrate before you with tribute of silver.
Scatter the peoples that delight in war.
  Nobles will come from Egypt,
  Ethiopia will stretch out its hands to God.
Kingdoms of the earth, sing to God;
  celebrate the Lord.
Sing to God who rides on the highest heavens,
  at the origin of all things.
Listen! – he speaks, a voice of power.
Acknowledge the strength of the Lord:
  his majesty is over Israel,
  his strength is in the clouds.
God inspires awe in his holy place;
  he, the God of Israel, gives power to his people;
  he gives them strength.
Blessed be God!
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Kingdoms of the earth, sing to God, praise the Lord.

I will hear whatever the Lord God has to say:
words of peace for his people.

First Reading
Judges 6:1-6,11-24 ©
The call of Gideon
The Israelites did what displeases the Lord; the Lord gave them over for seven years into the hands of Midian, and Midian bore down heavily on Israel. To escape from Midian the Israelites used the mountain clefts and the caves and shelters. Whenever Israel sowed seed, Midian would march up with Amalek and the sons of the East; they would march up against Israel and encamp on their territory and destroy the produce of the country as far as Gaza. They left Israel nothing to live on, not a sheep or ox or donkey, for they came up as thick as locusts with their own cattle and their tents; they and their camels were past counting, they overran and pillaged the country. Thus Midian brought Israel to great distress, and the Israelites cried to the Lord.
  The angel of the Lord came and sat under the terebinth at Ophrah which belonged to Joash of Abiezer. Gideon his son was threshing wheat inside the winepress to keep it hidden from Midian, when the angel of the Lord appeared to him and said, ‘The Lord is with you, valiant warrior!’ Gideon answered him, ‘Forgive me, my lord, but if the Lord is with us, then why is it that all this is happening to us now? And where are all the wonders our ancestors tell us of when they say, “Did not the Lord bring us out of Egypt?” But now the Lord has deserted us; he has abandoned us to Midian.’
  At this the Lord turned to him and said, ‘Go in the strength now upholding you, and you will rescue Israel from the power of Midian. Do I not send you myself?’ Gideon answered him, ‘Forgive me, my lord, but how can I deliver Israel? My clan, you must know, is the weakest in Manasseh and I am the least important in my family.’ The Lord answered him, ‘I will be with you and you shall crush Midian as though it were a single man.’ Gideon said to him, ‘If I have found favour in your sight, give me a sign that it is you who speak to me. I beg you, do not go away until I come back. I will bring you my offering and set it down before you.’ And he answered, ‘I will stay until you return.’
  Gideon went away and prepared a young goat and made unleavened cakes with an ephah of flour. He put the meat into a basket and the broth into a pot, then brought it all to him under the terebinth. As he came near, the angel of the Lord said to him, ‘Take the meat and unleavened cakes, put them on this rock and pour the broth over them.’ Gideon did so. Then the angel of the Lord reached out the tip of the staff in his hand and touched the meat and unleavened cakes. Fire sprang from the rock and consumed the meat and unleavened cakes, and the angel of the Lord vanished before his eyes. Then Gideon knew this was the angel of the Lord, and he said, ‘Alas, my Lord! I have seen the angel of the Lord face to face!’ The Lord answered him, ‘Peace be with you; have no fear; you will not die.’ Gideon built an altar there to the Lord and called it The-Lord-is-Peace. This altar still stands at Ophrah of Abiezer.
Responsory
Is 45:4-6; Jg 6:14
℟. I am the Lord who calls you by name for the sake of Jacob my servant and Israel my chosen one.* Go in your might and deliver Israel.
℣. I will strengthen you, so that all men may know that I am the Lord.* Go in your might and deliver Israel.

Second Reading
From the biography of St Romuald
Denying oneself and following Christ
Romuald lived in the vicinity of the city of Parenzo for three years. In the first year he built a monastery and appointed an abbot with monks. For the next two years he remained there in seclusion. In that setting, divine holiness transported him to such a summit of perfection that, breathed upon by the Holy Spirit, he foresaw many future events and comprehended with the rays of his intelligence hidden mysteries of the Old and New Testament.
  Frequently he was seized by so great a contemplation of divinity that he would be reduced to tears with the boiling, indescribable heat of divine love. In this condition he would cry out: Beloved Jesus, beloved, sweet honey, indescribable longing, delight of the saints, sweetness of the angels, and other things of this kind. We are unable to express the ecstasy of these utterances, dictated by the Holy Spirit.
  Wherever the holy man might arrange to live, he would follow the same pattern. First he would build an oratory with an altar in a cell; then he would shut himself in and forbid access.
  Finally, after he had lived in many places, perceiving that his end was near, he returned to the monastery he had built in the valley of Castro. While he awaited with certainty his approaching death, he ordered a cell to be constructed there with an oratory in which he might isolate himself and preserve silence until death.
  Accordingly the hermitage was built, since he had made up his mind that he would die there. His body began to grow more and more oppressed by afflictions and was already failing, not so much from weakness as from the exhaustion of great age. One day he began to feel the loss of his physical strength under all the harassment of increasingly violent afflictions. As the sun was beginning to set, he instructed two monks who were standing by to go out and close the door of the cell behind them; they were to come back to him at daybreak to celebrate matins. They were so concerned about his end that they went out reluctantly and did not rest immediately. On the contrary, since they were worried that their master might die, they lay hidden near the cell and watched this precious treasure. For some time they continued to listen attentively until they heard neither movement nor sound. Rightly guessing what had happened, they pushed open the door, rushed in quickly, lit a candle and found the holy man lying on his back, his blessed soul snatched up into heaven. As he lay there, he seemed like a neglected heavenly pearl that was soon to be given a place of honour in the treasury of the King of kings.
Responsory
℟. The Lord your God has blessed you in everything you have undertaken; he has watched your journey through the vast wilderness;* the Lord your God has been with you.
℣. As a man disciplines his son, he has disciplined you;* the Lord your God has been with you.

Let us pray.
Lord God, you chose Saint Romuald
  to restore the religious life of hermits in your Church.
Grant that, by denying ourselves and following Christ,
  we may come safely to the kingdom of heaven.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
  who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
  one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Let us praise the Lord.
– Thanks be to God.

The psalms and canticles here are our own translation. The Grail translation of the psalms, which is used liturgically in most of the English-speaking world, cannot be displayed on the Web for copyright reasons. The Universalis apps, programs and downloads do contain the Grail translation of the psalms.

You can also view this page in Latin and English.

Copyright © 1996-2018 Universalis Publishing Limited: see www.universalis.com. Scripture readings from the Jerusalem Bible are published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers.
 
This web site © Copyright 1996-2018 Universalis Publishing Ltd · Contact us · Cookies/privacy
(top