Universalis
Tuesday 26 May 2015    (other days)
Saint Philip Neri, Priest
 (Tuesday of week 8 in Ordinary Time)

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.


INTRODUCTION
O God, come to our aid.
  O Lord, make haste to help us.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.

Hymn
When God of old came down from heaven,
In power and wrath he came.
Before his feet the clouds were riven,
Half darkness and half flame;
But when he came the second time,
He came in power and love.
Softer than gale at morning prime
Hovered his holy Dove.
The fires that rushed on Sinai down
In sudden torrents dread,
Now gently light, a glorious crown,
On every sainted head.
And when the Spirit of our God
Came down his flock to find,
A voice from heaven was heard abroad,
A rushing, mighty wind.
It fills the Church of God, it fills
The sinful world around;
Only in stubborn hearts and wills
No place for it is found.
Come Lord, come Wisdom, Love and Power,
Open our ears to hear.
Let us not miss the accepted hour!
Save, Lord, by love or fear.

Psalm 101 (102)
Prayers and vows of an exile
Let my cry come to you, Lord: do not hide your face from me.
Lord, listen to my prayer
  and let my cry come to you.
Do not hide your face from me:
  whenever I am troubled,
  turn to me and hear me.
Whenever I call on you,
  hurry to answer me.
For my days vanish like smoke,
  and my bones are dry as tinder.
My heart is cut down like grass, it is dry –
  I cannot remember to eat.
The sound of my groaning
  makes my bones stick to my flesh.
I am lonely as a pelican in the wilderness,
  as an owl in the ruins,
  as a sparrow alone on a rooftop:
  I do not sleep.
All day long my enemies taunt me,
  they burn with anger and use my name as a curse.
I make ashes my bread,
  I mix tears with my drink,
  because of your anger and reproach –
you, who raised me up, have dashed me to the ground.
My days fade away like a shadow:
  I wither like grass.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Let my cry come to you, Lord: do not hide your face from me.

Psalm 101 (102)
Turn, Lord, to the prayers of the helpless.
But you, Lord, remain for ever
  and your name lasts from generation to generation.
You will rise up and take pity on Zion,
  for it is time that you pitied it,
  indeed it is time:
for your servants love its very stones
  and pity even its dust.
Then, Lord, the peoples will fear your name.
  All the kings of the earth will fear your glory,
when the Lord has rebuilt Zion
  and appeared there in his glory;
when he has listened to the prayer of the destitute
  and not rejected their pleading.
These things shall be written for the next generation
  and a people yet to be born shall praise the Lord:
because he has looked down from his high sanctuary,
 – the Lord has looked down from heaven to earth –
and heard the groans of prisoners
  and freed the children of death
so that they could proclaim the Lord’s name in Zion
  and sing his praises in Jerusalem,
where people and kingdoms gather together
  to serve the Lord.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Turn, Lord, to the prayers of the helpless.

Psalm 101 (102)
You founded the earth, Lord, and the heavens are the work of your hands.
He has brought down my strength in the midst of my journey;
  he has shortened my days.
I will say, “My God, do not take me away
  half way through the days of my life.
Your years last from generation to generation:
  in the beginning you founded the earth,
  and the heavens are the work of your hands.
They will pass away but you will remain;
  all will grow old, like clothing,
  and like a cloak you will change them, and they will be changed.
“But you are always the same,
  your years will never run out.
The children of your servants shall live in peace,
  their descendants will endure in your sight.”
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
You founded the earth, Lord, and the heavens are the work of your hands.

Listen, my people, to my teaching;
open your ears to the words of my mouth.

First ReadingJob 3:1-26 ©
In the end it was Job who broke the silence and cursed the day of his birth. This is what he said:
May the day perish when I was born,
  and the night that told of a boy conceived.
May that day be darkness,
  may God on high have no thought for it,
  may no light shine on it.
May murk and deep shadow claim it for their own,
  clouds hang over it,
  eclipse swoop down on it.
Yes, let the dark lay hold of it,
  to the days of the year let it not be joined,
  into the reckoning of months not find its way.
May that night be dismal,
  no shout of joy come near it.
Let them curse it who curse the day,
  who are prepared to rouse Leviathan.
Dark be the stars of its morning,
  let it wait in vain for light
  and never see the opening eyes of dawn.
Since it would not shut the doors of the womb on me
  to hide sorrow from my eyes.
Why did I not die new-born,
  not perish as I left the womb?
Why were there two knees to receive me,
  two breasts for me to suck?
Had there not been, I should now be lying in peace,
  wrapped in a restful slumber,
with the kings and high viziers of earth
  who build themselves vast vaults,
or with princes who have gold and to spare
  and houses crammed with silver.
Or put away like a still-born child that never came to be,
  like unborn babes that never see the light.
Down there, bad men bustle no more,
  there the weary rest.
Prisoners, all left in peace,
  hear no more the shouts of the gaoler.
Down there, high and low are all one,
  and the slave is free of his master.
Why give light to a man of grief?
  Why give life to those bitter of heart,
who long for a death that never comes,
  and hunt for it more than for a buried treasure?
They would be glad to see the grave-mound
  and shout with joy if they reached the tomb.
Why make this gift of light to a man who does not see his way,
  whom God baulks on every side?
My only food is sighs,
  and my groans pour out like water.
Whatever I fear comes true,
  whatever I dread befalls me.
For me, there is no calm, no peace;
  my torments banish rest.
Responsory
My only food is sighs, and my groans pour out like water. Whatever I fear comes true, whatever I dread befalls me. Nothing but turmoil is my lot, O Lord.
Can any power be found within myself, has not all help deserted me? Nothing but turmoil is my lot, O Lord.

Second Reading
From a sermon by Saint Augustine
Always rejoice in the Lord
The Apostle commands us to rejoice, but in the Lord, not in the world. For, you see, as Scripture says, whoever wishes to be a friend of this world will be counted as God’s enemy. Just as a man cannot serve two masters, so too no-one can rejoice both in the world and in the Lord.
  Let joy in the Lord win and go on winning, until people take no more joy in the world. Let joy in the Lord always go on growing, and joy in the world always go on shrinking until it is reduced to nothing. I do not mean that we should not rejoice as long as we are in this world, but that even while we do find ourselves in this world, we should already be rejoicing in the Lord.
  Someone may argue, “I am in the world; so obviously, if I rejoice, I rejoice where I am”. What of it? Because you are in the world, does it mean that you are not in the Lord? Listen to the same Apostle in the Acts of the Apostles, speaking to the Athenians, and saying about God and about the Lord, our Creator, In him we live, and move, and are. Since he is everywhere, there is nowhere that he is not. Is it not precisely this that he is emphasising to encourage us? The Lord is very near; do not be anxious about anything.
  This is something tremendous, that he ascended above all the heavens but is still very near to those who dwell on earth, wherever they may be. Who can this be that is both far away and close at hand, except the one who became our near neighbour out of mercy?
  The whole of the human race, you see, is that man who was lying in the road, left there by robbers, half dead, who was ignored by the passing priest and Levite, while the passing Samaritan stopped by him to take care of him and help him; and when the Immortal, the Just, was far away from us mortals and sinners, he came down to us to become – that far distant being – our near neighbour.
  He has not treated us according to our sins. For we are his children. How do we prove this? The only Son died for us so that he would not remain the only child. He did not want to be alone, who died alone. The only Son of God made many children for God. He bought himself brothers and sisters with his blood; rejected, he accepted us; sold, he bought us back; dishonoured, he honoured us; killed, he brought us life.
  So then, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord, not in the world; that is, rejoice in faithfulness and not in iniquity; rejoice in the hope of eternity and not the brief flower of vanity. Rejoice thus, and wherever you are here, as long as you are here, the Lord is very near: do not be anxious about anything.
Responsory
Rejoice, my brothers. Strive for perfection; listen to my appeals; agree with one another, and live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you.
May God, the source of hope, fill you with all joy and peace by means of your faith in him, and the God of love and peace will be with you.

Let us pray.
God our Father, you are continually raising to the glory of holiness
  those who serve you faithfully.
In your love, hear our prayer:
  let the Holy Spirit inflame us with that fire with which, in so admirable a way,
  he took possession of Saint Philip’s heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
  who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
  one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Let us praise the Lord.
– Thanks be to God.

The psalms and canticles here are our own translation. The Grail translation of the psalms, which is used liturgically in most of the English-speaking world, cannot be displayed on the Web for copyright reasons. The Universalis downloads do contain the Grail translation of the psalms.

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