Universalis
Tuesday 2 June 2020    (other days)
Tuesday of week 9 in Ordinary Time 
 or Saints Marcellinus and Peter, Martyrs 

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.


INTRODUCTION
O God, come to our aid.
  O Lord, make haste to help us.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.

Hymn
Worship, glory, praise and honour
To our God, high-throned above:
We, with many generations
Join to praise thy name of love.
In the scriptures, by the Spirit,
May we see the Saviour’s face,
Hear his word and heed his calling,
Know his will and grow in grace.

Psalm 9B (10)
Thanksgiving

The Lord will protect the rights of the oppressed.
With what purpose, Lord, do you stay away,
  hide yourself in time of need and trouble?
The wicked in their pride persecute the weak,
  trap them in the plots they have devised.
The sinner glories in his desires,
  the miser congratulates himself.
The sinner in his arrogance rejects the Lord:
  “there is no God, no retribution.”
This is what he thinks
 – and all goes well for him.
Your judgements are far beyond his comprehension:
  he despises all who stand against him.
The sinner says to himself: “I will stand firm;
  nothing can touch me, from generation to generation.”
His mouth is full of malice and deceit,
  under his tongue hide trouble and distress.
He lies in ambush by the villages,
  he kills the innocent in some secret place.
He watches the weak,
  he hides like a lion in its lair, and makes plans.
He plans to rob the weak,
  lure him to his trap and rob him.
He rushes in, makes a dive,
  and the poor victim is caught.
For he has said to himself, “God has forgotten.
  He is not watching, he will never see.”
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
The Lord will protect the rights of the oppressed.

Psalm 9B (10)

Lord, you have seen our trouble and our sorrow.
Rise up, Lord, raise your hand!
  Do not forget the weak.
Why does the wicked man spurn God?
  Because he says to himself, “you will not take revenge.”
But you do see: you see the trouble and the pain,
  and then you take things into your own hands.
The weak fall to your care,
  and you are the help of the orphan.
Break the arms of the sinner and evil-doer:
  seek out wickedness until there is no more to be found.
The Lord is King for ever and for ever.
  The Gentiles have perished from his land.
You have heard the prayer of the weak, Lord,
  and you will strengthen their hearts.
You will lend your ear to the pleas of the orphans and the helpless,
  so mere mortals can frighten them no longer.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Lord, you have seen our trouble and our sorrow.

Psalm 11 (12)
A prayer against the proud

The words of the Lord are words without alloy, silver from the furnace, seven times refined.
Save me, Lord, for the good men are all gone:
  there is no-one to be trusted among the sons of men.
Neighbour speaks falsehood to neighbour:
  with lying lips and crooked hearts they speak.
Let the Lord condemn all lying lips,
  all boastful tongues.
They say “Our tongues will make us great,
  our lips are ours, we have no master.”
“On account of the sufferings of the poor,
  the groans of the weak, I will rise up,” says the Lord.
  “I will bring to safety the one whom men despise.”
The words of the Lord are pure words,
  silver tried by fire, freed from dross,
  silver seven times refined.
You, Lord, will help us
  and guard us from now to all eternity –
while the wicked walk round outside,
  where the vilest are most honoured of the children of men.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son
  and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning,
  is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
The words of the Lord are words without alloy, silver from the furnace, seven times refined.

℣. The Lord guides his humble in the right path.
℟. He teaches his way to the poor.

First Reading
Job 31:1-8,13-23,35-37 ©

Job’s former righteousness

Job said:
I made a pact with my eyes,
  not to linger on any virgin.
Now, what shares does God deal out on high,
  what lots does Shaddai assign from heaven,
if not disaster for the wicked,
  and calamities for the iniquitous?
But surely he sees how I behave,
  does he not count all my steps?
Have I been a fellow traveller with falsehood,
  or hastened my steps towards deceit?
If he weighs me on honest scales,
  being God, he cannot fail to see my innocence.
If my feet have wandered from the rightful path,
  or if my eyes have led my heart astray,
  or if my hands are smirched with any stain,
let another eat what I have sown,
  and let my young shoots all be rooted out.
If ever I have infringed the rights of slave
  or maidservant in legal actions against me —
what shall I do, when God stands up?
  What shall I say, when he holds his assize?
They, no less than I, were created in the womb
  by the one same God who shaped us all within our mothers.
If my land calls down vengeance on my head
  and every furrow runs with tears,
if without payment I have eaten fruit grown on it
  or given those who toiled there cause to groan,
let brambles grow where once was wheat,
  and foul weeds where barley thrived.
Have I been insensible to poor men’s needs,
  or let a widow’s eyes grow dim?
Or taken my share of bread alone,
  not giving a share to the orphan?
I, whom God has fostered father-like, from childhood,
  and guided since I left my mother’s womb.
Have I ever seen a wretch in need of clothing,
  or a beggar going naked,
without his having cause to bless me from his heart,
  as he felt the warmth of the fleece from my lambs?
Have I raised my hand against the guiltless,
  presuming on my credit at the gate?
If so, then let my shoulder fall from its socket,
  my arm be shattered at the joint.
God’s terror would indeed descend on me;
  how could I hold my ground before his majesty?
Who can get me a hearing from God?
  I have had my say, from A to Z; now let Shaddai answer me.
When my adversary has drafted his writ against me
I shall wear it on my shoulder,
  and bind it round my head like a royal turban.
I will give him an account of every step of my life,
  and go as boldly as a prince to meet him.
Responsory
Jb 31:3-4; Pr 15:3
℟. What shares does God deal out on high, if not disaster for the wicked and calamities for the iniquitous?* The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, observing the evil and the good.
℣. Surely he sees how I behave: does he not count all my steps?* The eyes of the Lord are everywhere, observing the evil and the good.

Second Reading
A colloquy of St Dorotheus

On false spiritual peace

The man who finds fault with himself accepts all things cheerfully – misfortune, loss, disgrace, dishonour and any other kind of adversity. He believes that he is deserving of all these things and nothing can disturb him. No one could be more at peace than this man.
  But perhaps you will offer me this objection: “Suppose my brother injures me, and on examining myself I find that I have not given him any cause. Why should I blame myself?”
  Certainly if someone examines himself carefully and with fear of God, he will never find himself completely innocent. He will see that he has given some provocation by an action, a word or by his manner. If he does find that he is not guilty in any of these ways, certainly he must have injured that brother somehow at some other time. Or perhaps he has been a source of annoyance to some other brother. For this reason he deserves to endure the injury because of many other sins that he has committed on other occasions.
  Someone else asks why he should accuse himself when he was sitting peacefully and quietly when a brother came upon him with an unkind or insulting word. He cannot tolerate it, and so he thinks that his anger is justified. If that brother had not approached him and said those words and upset him, he never would have sinned.
  This kind of thinking is surely ridiculous and has no rational basis. For the fact that he has said anything at all in this situation breaks the cover on the passionate anger within him, which is all the more exposed by his excessive anxiety. If he wished, he would do penance. He has become like a clean, shiny grain of wheat that, when broken, is full of dirt inside.
  The man who thinks that he is quiet and peaceful has within him a passion that he does not see. A brother comes up, utters some unkind word and immediately all the venom and mire that lie hidden within him are spewed out. If he wishes mercy, he must do penance, purify himself and strive to become perfect. He will see that he should have returned thanks to his brother instead of returning the injury, because his brother has proven to be an occasion of profit to him. It will not be long before he will no longer be bothered by these temptations. The more perfect he grows, the less these temptations will affect him. For the more the soul advances, the stronger and more powerful it becomes in bearing the difficulties that it meets.
Responsory
℟. Indeed I know that no man can be in the right against God.* How dare I plead my cause, then, or choose arguments against him?
℣. In his own Holy Ones God puts no trust, and the heavens themselves are not clean in his eyes.* How dare I plead my cause, then, or choose arguments against him?

Let us pray.
Lord God,
  by whom our lives are governed with unfailing wisdom and love,
take away from us all that is harmful
  and give us all that will be for our good.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
  who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
  one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Let us praise the Lord.
– Thanks be to God.

The psalms and canticles here are our own translation. The Grail translation of the psalms, which is used liturgically in most of the English-speaking world, cannot be displayed on the Web for copyright reasons. The Universalis apps and programs do contain the Grail translation of the psalms.

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