Universalis
Monday 8 March 2021    (other days)
Monday of week 9 in Ordinary Time 
 or Saint John of God, Religious 

Let us come before the Lord, giving thanks.

Year: B(I). Psalm week: 1. Liturgical Colour: Green.

St John of God (1495 - 1550)

He was born to a poor but devout family in Portugal in 1495. After serving as a soldier under the Emperor Charles V he devoted his life wholly to the service of the poor and the sick. He founded a hospital in Granada and a circle of disciples formed round him, which later became the Order of Hospitallers. He died on 8 March 1550, his 55th birthday. See the articles in Wikipedia and the Catholic Encyclopaedia.

Other saints: Saint Senan, Bishop (488 - 544)

Ireland
He is one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland. He was born in County Clare, and having travelled and studied in Europe he returned to Ireland, where he established a church and monastery at Inniscarra, in Cork. He then moved back to his native district and eventually founded a monastery (with an exceptionally austere rule) at Scattery, an island off Kilrush, where he died. See the article by Clare Library.

Other saints: Saint Duthac (1000-1065)

Aberdeen
He was born in Tain, in Ross and Cromarty, Scotland. He was educated in Ireland, and was Bishop of Ross.

Other saints: St Felix (7th century)

East Anglia
A native of Burgundy, Felix became a bishop in Gaul and offered himself to work for the conversion of the East Angles. In 630 Sigebert, their king, came back from exile and work began.
  Felix undertook the mission with the approval of Honorius of Canterbury, and placed his episcopal see at Dunwich, now washed away by the sea. He preached with great success in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire.
East Anglian Ordo

About the author of the Second Reading in today's Office of Readings:

Second Reading: St Dorotheus

Saint Dorotheus of Gaza was a sixth-century monk and abbot. After spending some time as a monk at the Abba Serid monastery near Gaza, he founded his own monastery not far from there. Many of teachings were preserved and gathered as Directions on Spiritual Training. These were widely read in the East, and translated into Syriac, Arabic, Georgian, and Church Slavonic. His teaching is clear, simple, straightforward and practical, avoiding excesses of both theory and rhetoric.

Liturgical colour: green

The theological virtue of hope is symbolized by the colour green, just as the burning fire of love is symbolized by red. Green is the colour of growing things, and hope, like them, is always new and always fresh. Liturgically, green is the colour of Ordinary Time, the orderly sequence of weeks through the year, a season in which we are being neither single-mindedly penitent (in purple) nor overwhelmingly joyful (in white).

Mid-morning reading (Terce)Romans 13:8,10 ©
Avoid getting into debt, except the debt of mutual love. If you love your fellow men you have carried out your obligations. Love is the one thing that cannot hurt your neighbour; that is why it is the answer to every one of the commandments.

Noon reading (Sext)James 1:19-20,26 ©
Be quick to listen but slow to speak and slow to rouse your temper; God’s righteousness is never served by man’s anger. Nobody must imagine that he is religious while he still goes on deceiving himself and not keeping control over his tongue; anyone who does this has the wrong idea of religion.

Afternoon reading (None)1 Peter 1:17,18,19 ©
You must be scrupulously careful as long as you are living away from your home. Remember, the ransom that was paid to free you was not paid in anything corruptible, neither in silver nor gold, but in the precious blood of a lamb without spot or stain, namely Christ.
Scripture readings taken from The Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd, Ltd and Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc, and used by permission of the publishers. For on-line information about other Random House, Inc. books and authors, see the Internet web site at http://www.randomhouse.com.
 
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