Universalis
Monday 30 May 2016    (other days)
Saint Margaret Clitherow and the Yorkshire Martyrs 
 (Monday of week 9 in Ordinary Time)

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.


INTRODUCTION
O God, come to our aid.
  O Lord, make haste to help us.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.

Hymn
O God of truth, prepare our minds
To hear and heed your holy word;
Fill every heart that longs for you
With your mysterious presence, Lord.
Almighty Father, with your Son
And blessed Spirit, hear our prayer:
Teach us to love eternal truth
And seek its freedom everywhere.
Stanbrook Abbey Hymnal

Psalm 6
A prayer for relief from affliction
Lord, save me in your merciful love.
Lord, do not condemn me in your fury:
  do not destroy me in your anger.
Take pity on me, Lord, for I am sick;
  heal me, Lord, for my bones are in disarray.
My spirit is deeply disturbed,
  and you, Lord – how long?
Turn to me, Lord, rescue my spirit:
  in your pity, save me.
If I die, how can I praise you?
  Can anyone in the underworld proclaim your name?
I struggle and groan,
  soak my bed with weeping night after night;
my eyes are troubled with sadness:
  I grow older as my enemies watch.
Leave me, all who do evil,
  for the Lord has heard my voice as I wept.
The Lord listened to my prayer,
  granted me what I asked.
Let my enemies be ashamed and confounded:
  let shame and confusion overtake them soon.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
Lord, save me in your merciful love.

Psalm 9A (9)
Thanksgiving for victory
The Lord is a stronghold for the oppressed in times of distress.
I will thank you, Lord, with all my heart;
  I will tell of your wonders.
I will rejoice in you and triumph,
  make music to your name, O Most High.
Because my enemies are in full retreat;
  they stumble and perish at your presence.
For you have given judgement in my favour,
  upheld my case,
  taken your seat on the throne of judgement.
You have rebuked the nations,
  condemned the wicked,
  wiped out their name for ever and for ever.
My enemies are no more;
  their land is a desert for ever.
You have demolished their cities,
  their very memory is wiped away.
But the Lord will reign for ever:
  he has made his throne his judgement-seat.
He himself will judge the whole world in justice,
  judge the peoples impartially.
The Lord will be a refuge for the oppressed,
  a refuge in good times and in bad.
Let them put their hope in you, those who know your name;
  for you, Lord, have never abandoned those who seek you.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
The Lord is a stronghold for the oppressed in times of distress.

Psalm 9A (9)
I will recount all your praise at the gates of the city of Sion.
Sing to the Lord who dwells in Zion,
  proclaim to the nations his loving care.
For he has remembered the poor and avenged them with blood:
  he has not forgotten the cry of the weak.
Take pity on me, Lord:
  see how my enemies torment me.
You raise me up from the gates of death,
  and I will proclaim your praise at the gates of the daughter of Zion;
  I will rejoice in your salvation.
The nations have fallen into the pit that they made,
  into the very trap that they set: their feet are caught fast.
The Lord’s justice shines forth:
  the sinner is trapped by his very own action.
Sinners will go down to the underworld,
  and all nations that forget God.
For the weak will not always be forgotten:
  the hope of the weak will never perish.
Rise up, Lord, let men not be complacent:
  let the nations come before you to be judged.
Put fear into them, Lord:
  let them know that they are only men.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
  as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
  world without end.
Amen.
I will recount all your praise at the gates of the city of Sion.

Give me understanding, and I will follow your law.
I will keep it wholeheartedly.

First Reading
Job 29:1-10,30:1,9-23 ©
And Job continued his solemn discourse. He said:
Who will bring back to me the months that have gone,
  and the days when God was my guardian,
when his lamp shone over my head,
  and his light was my guide in the darkness?
Shall I ever see my autumn days again
  when God hedged round my tent;
when Shaddai dwelt with me,
  and my children were around me;
when my feet were plunged in cream,
  and streams of oil poured from the rocks?
When I went out to the gate of the city,
  when I took my seat in the square,
as soon as I appeared, the young men stepped aside,
  while the older men rose to their feet.
Men of note interrupted their speeches,
  and put their fingers on their lips;
The voices of rulers were silenced,
  and their tongues stayed still in their mouths.
And now I am the laughing-stock
  of my juniors, the young people,
whose fathers I did not consider fit
  to put with the dogs that looked after my flock.
And these are the ones that now sing ballads about me,
  and make me the talk of the town!
To them I am loathsome, they stand aloof from me,
  do not scruple to spit in my face.
Because he has unbent my bow and chastened me
  they cast the bridle from their mouth.
That brood of theirs rises to right of me,
  stones are their weapons,
  and they take threatening strides towards me.
They have cut me off from all escape,
  there is no one to check their attack.
They move in, as though through a wide breach,
  and I am crushed beneath the rubble.
Terrors turn to meet me,
  my confidence is blown away as if by the wind;
  my hope of safety passes like a cloud.
And now the life in me trickles away,
  days of grief have gripped me.
At night-time, sickness saps my bones,
  I am gnawed by wounds that never sleep.
With immense power it has caught me by the clothes,
  clutching at the collar of my coat.
It has thrown me into the mud
  where I am no better than dust and ashes.
I cry to you, and you give me no answer;
  I stand before you, but you take no notice.
You have grown cruel in your dealings with me,
  your hand lies on me, heavy and hostile.
You carry me up to ride the wind,
  tossing me about in a tempest.
I know it is to death that you are taking me,
  the common meeting place of all that lives.
Responsory
℟. At night-time sickness saps my bones, I am gnawed by wounds that never sleep;* it has thrown me into the mud, where I am no better than dust and ashes.
℣. Leave me, Lord, for my days are but a breath;* it has thrown me into the mud, where I am no better than dust and ashes.

Second Reading
A true Report of the Life and Martyrdom of Mrs Margaret Clitherow
After the priests had first suffered martyrdom at Knavesmire (all of which at most had been her ghostly fathers)and by their holy blood and death had sanctified their reproachful gallows, she greatly desired often to visit that place, for she called it her pilgrimage; and thither she would go, accompanied with two or three virtuous women. This being the common place for execution for all sorts of malefactors, distant half a mile from the centre of York, made the passage sometimes more difficult to her, because she might not adventure thither but by night because of spies, and only at such time as her husband was from home. Her desire was greater often to go thither, where so many of her ghostly fathers had shed their blood in witness of the Catholic faith, where they had triumphed over the world, the flesh, and the devil, from whence they had ascended into heaven, where she earnestly wished (if it were God’s will) for the same Catholic cause to end her life, and where she hoped one day God would be glorified in the memory of his martyrs. But by reason of this wicked time, her ghostly Father thought not good to permit her so often to go as she desired.
  As I remember she went barefoot to the place, and kneeling on her bare knees even under the gallows, meditated and prayed so long as her company would suffer her. As I understand, her desire and request was, after she was condemned, that she might be carried to this place to suffer what cruelty they pleased, but they would not grant it; no doubt but by God’s Providence that her glorious death might sanctify some other profane place.
Responsory
℟. The souls of the virtuous are in the hands of God; no torment shall ever touch them. Although in the sight of men they were punished, their hope is full of immortality;* slight was their affliction, great will their blessings be.
℣. God tested them and found them worthy of himself. Slight was their affliction, great will their blessings be.* Slight was their affliction, great will their blessings be.

Let us pray.
Lord God,
  from whom your martyrs draw their inspiration and strength,
  enable us through the intercession of St Margaret Clitherow and the Yorkshire Martyrs
so to lead our life in this world
  as not to lose that of the world to come.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
  who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
  one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

Let us praise the Lord.
– Thanks be to God.

The psalms and canticles here are our own translation. The Grail translation of the psalms, which is used liturgically in most of the English-speaking world, cannot be displayed on the Web for copyright reasons. The Universalis downloads do contain the Grail translation of the psalms.

You can also view this page in Latin and English.

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